App Security Requirements

androidsecuritylogo.pngI believe that many Android (and iOS) developers have a blind spot for app security. Clients, product owners, product managers or whoever is responsible for the app rarely have security requirements and time-starved developers tend to ignore the problem.

What’s the problem? Well, on Android (see later for iOS) there are so many ways attackers can attack your app. Whether it’s re-packaging your app with malware, repackaging to circumvent functionality, stealing ip or stealing secure data an attacker has many choices of ways to attack. Methods include:

  • Unzipping, decompilation, recompilation and re-packaging of your code
  • Patching Android OS calls at runtime to intercept data
  • Examining runtime memory to see data
  • Taking a backup of app data and reading it offline

Some of these things are possible on unrooted devices and all these things are possible via a rooted device or, more seriously, via exploits that allow temporary access as root. Determined attackers can also create custom ROMs or emulator images that can intercept your app at given points in its lifecycle.

I encourage all Android developers to do some background reading. The droidsec Wiki is a great place to start to see the scale of the problem and the tools available. Unfortunately, there’s a lot more information on how to hack than there is on how to prevent hacking presumably because it’s more fun to break things than fix them. My Android Security site offers a ‘coding first’, guideline-based approach to prevent, as opposed to detect, security problems.

If you are a product owner or product manager I suggest you also research this area, define your secure data and, if necessary, uncover security requirements for your app.

For those iOS developers thinking, "Oh that’s Android, we are safe on iOS", you might like to take a look at Lookout’s latest assessment of iOS security and my previous post on Android vs iOS security.