Android Permission Complications

I previously wrote about the new Android M Permissions scheme and how, while more transparent permissions is good for everyone, they introduce a lot of complications. These complications are yet another example of something that developers usually know a lot about but their product managers and some designers won’t know how to resolve. This leads to lots of trouble agreeing/deciding how screens and messages should look and feel, especially when developers aren’t included in the pre-development stages of a project.

There’s discussion that even top apps might be avoiding the move to targeting Marshmallow so as to avoid the complications. I have one such client project where I did some small changes that involved fixing on M devices but I didn’t have the time budget to go through the new permissions implications with my client. Hence the app stayed targeting Lollipop. I have another client who isn’t interested in M at all until it is seeing a greater uptake on devices. I suspect these scenarios are typical at the moment. However, most apps will one day have to ‘bite the bullet’.

This week’s Android Dev summit, particularly day 1, has some great recommendations on to how to handle the new permissions scheme. However, the real problems are with edge cases that can seriously bazooka your app. The first was an Android Dev summit audience question and involves what happens if the user taps “Don’t ask again” and the user then has to go to App… Settings to fix the problem, The Android team said that if this happens, you have lost the trust of your user and that’s that. However, Manideep Polireddi has some thoughts on how you might recover from this situation. Another edge case is if the user does “Reset app preferences” as explained by the CommonsBlogs.

Stepping back, is all this worth it? What is this all about? There’s a very recent article on the Forrester blog where it says…

“Consumers are more willing than ever to walk away from your business if you fail to protect their data and privacy”

Some might say that this is something for older users and that younger millenials have a different attitude to privacy. However, the Forrester research shows this isn’t true…

forresterprivacy Forrester says that privacy concerns are very much alive and are set to be a competitive differentiator in years to come. For apps, this means that those that do it well will be rewarded with better user retention.